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Princeton University Course/Program Name
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International :01 Jan 
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MArch Architecture

 Course Level
Masters / PG
 Type
Full Time

 Duration
2 Years
 Start month
September

 Tuition fee

International
43450 USD
National
43450 USD

Application fee

International 90 USD
National 90 USD
Department
School of Architecture
Scores accepted
7

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About this course

The School of Architecture, Princeton’s center for teaching and research in architectural design, history, and theory, offers advanced degrees at both the master’s and the doctoral levels. The curriculum for the master’s degree, which has both a professional and a post-professional track, emphasizes design expertise in the context of architectural scholarship. Architecture is understood as a cultural practice involving both speculative intelligence and practical know-how. Each student constructs a personal course of study around a core of required courses that represents the knowledge essential to the education of an architect today.

Program Description:Professional Master’s Degree

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.), accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), is intended for students who plan to practice architecture professionally. It qualifies them to take the state professional licensing examination after completing the required internship. Refer to the NAAB statement on the School of Architecture’s website(link is external) for more information.

Students are eligible for admission to the graduate program whether or not they have had undergraduate work in architecture. The typical duration of the program is three years; students with an undergraduate architecture background may be eligible for advanced standing.

Check further details on University website

Eligibility Criteria

The Graduate School requires that all non-native speakers of English who have not earned their undergraduate degree in a U.S. college or university and who scored below a 28 on the Speaking sub-section of the TOEFL iBT or below an 8.0 on the Speaking sub-section of the IELTS have their oral English proficiency evaluated by the ELP staff. At the start of the fall term, such students will be given placement tests to evaluate their oral English proficiency by the ELP staff. The Graduate School has established that passing either the placement test or the Princeton Oral Proficiency Test (POPT) qualifies a graduate student to be appointed as an assistant in instruction (AI) and attests to the student’s basic proficiency in spoken English. The proficiency levels on the placement test are as follows:

  • Students who test at the advanced level will be eligible to teach whenever they are appointed as AIs and will not be required to participate in ELP classes.
  • Students who test at the high-intermediate level are required to participate in the ELP oral communication classes during their first semester of study. This will include four hours of coursework. These students are eligible to take the POPT upon successful completion of their first term in ELP classes.
  • Students who test in the low-intermediate level are required to participate in 5 hours of coursework, plus one tutorial hour during their first two semesters at Princeton, and will only be eligible to take the POPT after successful completion of two semesters in ELP classes.
  • Students who test in the low-intermediate level are required to participate in 5 hours of coursework, plus one tutorial hour during their first two semesters at Princeton, and will only be eligible to take the POPT after successful completion of two semesters in ELP classes.

Check further details on University website

Course Modules

Post-Professional Master’s Degree

A post-professional M.Arch. degree is available to those who hold the degree of Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) or its equivalent from an international institution. These are students who have successfully completed a professional program in architecture and have fulfilled the educational requirements for professional licensing in the state or country in which the degree was granted. Students typically complete this program in two years. The post-professional degree is not accredited by the NAAB.
Courses:

Students in the professional M.Arch. program must take a minimum of 24 courses, typically four per term, including one design studio each term and the independent design thesis in the final term. The studio sequence, required technology and professional practice courses, and basic courses in history and theory and urbanism constitute a core that represents the basic knowledge of the discipline. In addition to these required courses, each student must complete distribution requirements within the areas of history and theory and building technology. In order to encourage the development of an individual program of study, each student may select up to three electives, which may be fulfilled with any course offered within the University and approved by the director of graduate studies.

Students granted advanced standing are usually required to take a minimum of 16 courses within the distributional requirements of the three-year program, including one design studio each term and the independent design thesis in the final term. Because of the differences in the educational backgrounds of students entering with advanced standing, the required number of courses in the areas of distribution is determined by the director of graduate studies after reviewing each student’s transcript and experience.

Students in the post-professional master’s degree program are granted wide latitude in course selection in order to create a program of study which aligns with their individual educational and research goals. The courses are distributed across the areas of design studios and a design thesis, history and theory, technology, and elective courses that can be taken throughout the University with the approval of the director of graduate studies. Students entering the program in fall 2014 or later are required to take a minimum of 16 courses.
Thesis:

The thesis at Princeton is understood to be the culmination of the Master of Architecture curriculum and, as such, it is the moment when the student contributes to, and advances, the discipline. Students participate in a thesis workshop during their penultimate semester. The aim of this workshop is to hone topics by situating them within a lineage—articulating where a project resembles or differs from works that have addressed such topics—and by developing a focused argument for a particular approach to the question. The thesis design project, conducted as independent work during the final semester, then tests this approach in a project whose underpinnings are pointed toward the synthesis of intellectual and design objectives. The thesis concludes with a public final review, where the project is evaluated both on its own terms and within the broader field of contemporary architectural discourse.

Additional Requirements:Computer Requirement
Students entering the M.Arch. programs are required to have a computer, set up at the school as part of their studio equipment, that meets the minimum specifications that are issued to all admitted students following the conclusion of the admission process. In general, the minimum requirement is for a Windows XP Professional workstation that would have a useful life of at least three years, and would be capable of being integrated into the University network and running the suite of software that is distributed to all students connected in the University network. In addition, M.Arch. students are required to pay a yearly $350 computer lab fee for access to the computers, plotters, and printers in the lab and the software on the network server.

Check further details on University website

How to Apply

Required Application Components

  • A completed application form. You must submit your application through either the Common Application or the Universal College Application. The Common Application may be submitted online (preferred) or by PDF. The Universal College Application may be submitted online (preferred) or by PDF.
  • Princeton's Writing Supplement to the Common Application. If applying through the Common Application, all applicants must submit the writing supplement online (preferred) or by PDF
  • Princeton’s Supplement to the Universal College Application. If applying through the Universal College Application, all applicants must submit the supplement either online or by PDF.
  • A School Report (SR), Counselor Recommendation and transcript. The SR form is available from the Common Application and Universal College Application website. Please ask your high school counselor or other school official to complete and submit the SR form, along with a letter of evaluation and an official transcript. If you are using the Common Application online please note that the SR and the Counselor Recommendation are separate items. Be sure to 'invite' your counselor to complete both items.
  • Two teacher recommendations. Please ask two of your teachers from different academic areas of study to complete and send the teacher recommendation forms available on the Common Application and Universal College Application site. Choose teachers from two different areas of study.
  • A Mid-year School Report. Please ask your high school counselor or other school official to complete and submit this form, which is available on the Common Application and Universal Application site.
  • SAT Reasoning Test or ACT. Early action applicants are strongly encouraged to complete their SAT and ACT tests before the Nov. 1 deadline. Regular decision applicants should take the SAT Reasoning Test by the January test date or take the ACT with Writing by the December date. Learn more about standardized testing for admission.
  • SAT Subject Tests. We recommend, but do not require, the submission of two SAT Subject Tests, which often assist us in the evaluation process. We have no preference for the specific SAT Subject Tests applicants might choose to take. However, if you apply for the B.S.E. degree, we recommend that you take mathematics (Level I or II) and either physics or chemistry. If you decide to submit Subject Tests, early action applicants should take them by the November test date, and regular decision applicants should take them by the January test date. Learn more about standardized testing for admission.
  • Test Registration Codes. When registering for the SAT or ACT, use the following codes to ensure your scores are sent to Princeton:
  • SAT: 2672
  • ACT: 2588
  • TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic scores. If English is not your native language and you are attending a school where English is not the language of instruction, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic), in addition to the SAT or ACT. You are not required to take the TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic if English is your native language or if you have spent at least three years at a secondary school where English is the primary language of instruction.
  • TOEFL: 2672

Check further details on University website

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