Update your status of this course
Yale University Course/Program Name
Application closes on
National :01 Jan 
International :01 Jan 

BA Music

 Course Level
Bachelors / UG
 Type
Full Time

 Duration
4 Years
 Start month
August

 Tuition fee

International
68230 USD
National
68230 USD

Application fee

International 80 USD
National 80 USD
Department
Department of Music
Scores accepted
IELTS (min)7
TOEFL-IBT (min)100
TOEFL-PBT (min)600
SAT (avg)1425
ACT (avg)34
12

World University Ranking

Get the best abroad education loan at free of cost

WeMakeScholars initiative is supported by the Govt. of India; associated with 10+ public/private banks & NBFCs.

Due to high number of loan requests from your region, we are not accepting any new applications at the moment. We believe in offering quality service to our customers.

Sorry for the inconvenience caused.


About this course

The Department of Music offers introductory and advanced instruction in the history of music, the theory of music, composition, music technology, and performance. Level I courses, which are introductory courses numbered from 100 to 199, are open to all undergraduates and require no previous experience in music. Intermediate courses (Levels II and III) are numbered in the 200s and 300s, and may require a familiarity with music notation. Advanced courses (Level IV) are numbered in the 400s and are for seniors, juniors, and qualified sophomores. Level III and IV courses are intended primarily for students majoring in Music, but they may be elected by others who meet the stated prerequisites.

Check further details on University website

Eligibility Criteria

Prerequisites 

MUSI 210, 211, 218, and 219, or equivalents

Number of courses 

12 term courses beyond prereqs, 11 numbered 300 or above

Specific courses required 

MUSI 350, 351, 352, 353; 2 from MUSI 301–311; 1 Level III or IV course with the WR designation

Distribution of courses 

4 addtl courses from Levels II, III, IV, of which only 1 is from Level II

Senior requirement 

One-term senior essay or project in MUSI 490–497

Intensive major 

Two-term senior essay or project (MUSI 490, 491, or 492, 493, or 494, 495)

English language requirement:

  • IELTS: 7
  • TOEFL-IBT: 100
  • TOEFL-PBT: 600
  • SAT: 1425
  • ACT: 34

Check further details on University website

Course Modules

Freshman Seminars
* MUSI 002a, The Role of the Performer in the Musical Experience  Michael Friedmann

Various models of the role of the performer in the composer-performer-audience partnership that comprises the musical experience. Repertoire for case studies ranges from baroque to mid-twentieth-century works, and from solo (both vocal and instrumental) to chamber and orchestral works. Audio and video recordings are used to introduce concepts of interpretation, stylistic approaches associated with specific historical periods, the performer as intermediary for the composer's wishes, and the performer's use of repertoire as a platform for personal expression. Extensive listening exercises. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. Prerequisite: ability to read music.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm
* MUSI 010b, Music and Diplomacy  Rebekah Ahrendt

The history of music in cultural diplomacy, with a focus on theoretical frameworks that grew up around musical practices as a result of music's diplomatic functions. Scores, instruments, and performers mobilized in the service of diplomacy; the influence of past practices on contemporary policy; state-sponsored musical tours; diplomatic patronage; universal vs. national music, including the use of such labels to further diplomatic goals. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
* MUSI 065a, Shape-Note Traditions of the United States  Ian Quinn

Introduction to the folk-song process known as shape-note or Sacred Harp singing, a unique tradition of community a cappella music-making. The tradition's roots in colonial New England, its growth in the southern states between the Civil War and the World Wars, and its complicated relationship to ethnic and national identity. Exploration of a way of relating to music that is fundamentally different from the performer-audience relationship; concepts of folk music and oral tradition. Students will participate in the local shape-note singing community. No singing experience or music-reading ability required. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
T 6pm-8pm; Th 5:30pm-6:30pm
Level I
* MUSI 107b, Exploring the Nature of Genius  Craig Wright

The changing meanings of the term "genius" in Western culture; discussion as to whether genius is a reality. Focus on the special talents needed to respond to and shape the world in a defining fashion, and the quirky patterns of thought exemplified by great minds, principally Leonardo da Vinci, Newton, Mozart, Woolf, Beethoven, van Gogh, Picasso, and Joyce. Recent developments in neurobiology that suggest future lines of research into the minds of exceptional individuals. Enrollment limited to 65.  WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm
MUSI 110a or b, Introduction to the Elements of Music  Staff

The fundamentals of musical language (notation, rhythm, scales, keys, melodies, and chords), including writing, analysis, singing, and dictation. Intended for students who have no music reading ability.
MUSI 112a, Listening to Music  Craig Wright

Development of aural skills that lead to an understanding of Western music. The musical novice is introduced to the ways in which music is put together and is taught how to listen to a wide variety of musical styles, from Bach and Mozart, to Gregorian chant, to the blues.  HU
TTh 10:30am-11:20am
MUSI 130a, Introduction to the History of Western Music: 900 to 1800  Rebekah Ahrendt

An introduction to the ways in which music has shaped—and been shaped by—cultural life from the Middle Ages until Mozart, emphasizing engaged listening. Major genres, styles, and trends; developments in musical instruments and technologies; social roles of music and musicians; responses to music in literature and art. No prior musical experience necessary. No prerequisites.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm
MUSI 131b, Introduction to the History of Western Music: 1800 to the Present  Gundula Kreuzer

A survey of nineteenth- and twentieth-century composers, genres, and styles of music in Europe and America, with an emphasis on ways of listening. No prerequisites.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm
Level II
* MUSI 210a or b, Elementary Studies in Analysis and Model Composition I  Staff

Practical investigation of the basic principles of tonal harmony, counterpoint, and composition through exercises in analysis, motivic development, phrase rhythm, texture, form, performance, and model composition. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 218 or 219. Admission after MUSI 110 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test. To be followed by MUSI 211.  HU
* MUSI 211a or b, Elementary Studies in Analysis and Model Composition II  Staff

Continuation of MUSI 210. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 218 or 219. Admission afterMUSI 210 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test.  HU  RP
* MUSI 214a, Musical Theater Composition I  Joshua Rosenblum

Introduction to elements of music- and lyric-writing for theater songs. Focus on the development of compositional proficiency in the musical theater idiom and on the refinement of each student's compositional voice. Prerequisite: MUSI 205. Enrollment limited to 12.  HU  RP
F 1:30pm-3:20pm
* MUSI 215b, Conduction Ensemble  Michael Veal

Workshop in the method of conduction, or conducted improvisation. Focus on learning and executing a set of conducting gestures that shape improvisations into spontaneously generated compositions. Open to vocalists and instrumentalists from all stylistic backgrounds and musical traditions. The course culminates in a public performance by the ensemble. No previous experience with improvisation required.  HU  RP
T 1:30pm-3:20pm
* MUSI 218a or b, Elementary Musicianship I  Staff

Exercises in melodic and harmonic dictation, sight-singing, keyboard harmony, and aural analysis Admission after MUSI 110 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test  RP  ½ Course cr
* MUSI 219a or b, Elementary Musicianship II  Staff

Continuation of MUSI 218. Prerequisite: MUSI 218. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 210 or 211.  RP  ½ Course cr
* MUSI 220a and MUSI 221b, The Performance of Chamber Music  Wendy Sharp

Coached chamber music emphasizing the development of ensemble skills, familiarization with the repertory, and musical analysis through performance. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail wendy.sharp@yale.edu. Credit for MUSI 220 only on completion of MUSI 221.  RP  ½ Course cr per term
T 4:30pm-6pm
* MUSI 222a or b, The Performance of Vocal Music  Richard Lalli

A course for singers and pianists that emphasizes the analysis and musical preparation of classical solo song and operatic repertoire. Examination of structure (poetic, harmonic, motivic), discussion of style, exploration of vocal techniques, and introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet. Students are strongly encouraged to supplement the course with individual voice instruction. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail richard.lalli@yale.edu.  HU  RP
T 6pm-8pm
* MUSI 223a, The Performance of Early Music  Grant Herreid

A study of musical styles of the twelfth through early eighteenth centuries, including examination of manuscripts, musicological research, transcription, score preparation, and performance. Students in this class form the nucleus of the Yale Collegium Musicum and participate in a concert series at the Beinecke Library. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail grant.herreid@yale.edu  HU  RP
M 3:30pm-5:20pm
* MUSI 228a / THST 224a, Musical Theater Performance I  Annette Jolles

The structure and meaning of traditional and contemporary musical theater repertoire. Focus on ways to "read" a work, decipher compositional cues for character and action, facilitate internalization of material, and elicit lucid interpretations. For singers, pianists, and directors. Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and 219, or with permission of instructor. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail dan.egan@yale.edu.  HU  RP
F 1:30pm-3:20pm
* MUSI 232a or b, Central Javanese Gamelan Ensemble  Staff

An introduction to performing the orchestral music of central Java and to the theoretical and aesthetic discourses of the gamelan tradition. Students form the nucleus of a gamelan ensemble that consists primarily of tuned gongs and metallophones; interested students may arrange for additional private instruction on more challenging instruments. The course culminates in a public performance by the ensemble. No previous musical experience required.  RP
* MUSI 246a / THST 236a, American Musical Theater History  Daniel Egan

Critical examination of relevance and context in the history of the American musical theater. Historical survey, including nonmusical trends, combined with text and musical analysis.  WR, HU  RP
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
MUSI 262a / AFAM 241a / AFST 262a, Traditional and Contemporary Musics of Sub-Saharan Africa Michael Veal

A survey of the traditional and popular musics of black Africa, organized both by nation, such as Ghana, and by region, such as Senegambia. Introduction to the fundamental musical principles, materials, and performance contexts of African music.  WR
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
MUSI 277b / AFAM 203b, Coltrane and Hendrix  Michael Veal

The parallel careers of John Coltrane and Jimi Hendrix in different genres of black music explored through biographical, music-analytical, and sociocontextual approaches. The stylistic evolutions in each musician's work; the music of Coltrane and Hendrix as embodiments of, and reactions to, the dominant musical and social issues of the 1960s.  HU
TTh 10:30am-11:20am
Level III
All courses numbered 300 and above require the ability to read music.

* MUSI 302a, Tonal Counterpoint: Analysis and Composition  Daniel Harrison

Intermediate studies in the theory, analysis, and composition of the music of the early and mid-eighteenth century. Prerequisite: MUSI 211. Enrollment limited to 18. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm
* MUSI 304a, Nineteenth-Century Music: Analysis and Model Composition  Richard Cohn

Studies in the theory, analysis, and composition of music of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: MUSI 211. Enrollment limited to 18. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm
* MUSI 305b, Twentieth-Century Music: Analysis and Model Composition  Michael Friedmann

Studies in the theory, analysis, and composition of music of the early and mid-twentieth century. Prerequisite: MUSI 211. Enrollment limited to 18. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
TTh 4pm-5:15pm
* MUSI 307a, Jazz Harmony  Brian Kane

An intensive study of the language of jazz, with a focus on jazz harmonies, scale-chord relationships, improvisational syntax, reharmonization, and transcription. Students analyze and transcribe solos, write model compositions, and acquire basic jazz piano skills. Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and 219. Enrollment limited to 18. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm
* MUSI 312a, Composition Seminar I  Kathryn Alexander

Intermediate project-oriented studies in music composition and instrumentation. Study of compositional procedures and techniques in a variety of genres and styles. Group and individual lessons. Prerequisite:MUSI 210 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. Students with questions should contact the instructor at kathryn.alexander@yale.edu.
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 313b, Composition Seminar II  Konrad Kaczmarek

Intermediate project-oriented studies in music composition and chamber music. Study of compositional procedures and techniques in a variety of genres and styles. Group and individual lessons. Prerequisite:MUSI 205, 214, or 312, or equivalent. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 20. To audition, students should upload one or two PDF scores and MP3 recordings in a single zip file by 4 p.m. on Wednesday, January 18, to the designated 313 audition dropbox on the Composition Seminar Web page at classesv2.yale.edu. Students with questions should contact the instructor at konrad.kaczmarek@yale.edu.  RP
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 314b, Musical Theater Composition II  Andrew Gerle

Intermediate and advanced project-oriented studies in composition of musical theater. Prerequisite:MUSI 210. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 12.  HU  RP
F 1:30pm-3:20pm
* MUSI 319a, Advanced Musicianship  Michael Friedmann

Development of students' ability to recognize and generate structures and processes particular to music of the twentieth century. Student composers and advanced performers of post-tonal music expand their perceptive skills. Course activities include singing (and playing), dictation, identification, improvisation, and recognition. Musical examples from the works of Schoenberg, Bartók, Debussy, and Stravinsky. Enrollment limited to 14.
MW 10:30am-11:20am
* MUSI 320a, Instrumentation and Orchestration  Kathryn Alexander

A study of instrumentation and orchestration in a variety of musical periods, genres and styles. Related creative project work and weekly labs. MUSI 210 or equivalent.
W 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 322b / THST 318b, Analyzing, Directing, and Performing Early Opera  Grant Herreid

Study of a seventeenth-century Venetian opera, with attention to structural analysis of text and music. Exploration of period performance practice, including rhetorical expression, musical style, gesture, dance, Italian elocution, and visual design. Production of the opera in conjunction with the Yale Baroque Opera Project. Open to all students, but designed especially for singers and directors. Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and 219. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail grant.herreid@yale.edu.  HU  RP
TTh 4pm-6pm
* MUSI 323a, Introduction to Conducting  Toshiyuki Shimada

An introduction to conducting through a detailed study of the problems of baton technique. Skills applied to selected excerpts from the standard literature, including concertos, recitatives, and contemporary music.
TTh 1pm-2:15pm
* MUSI 324b, Intermediate Conducting  Toshiyuki Shimada

Intermediate studies in baton technique and score preparation. After MUSI 323.
TTh 1pm-2:15pm
* MUSI 325a, Fundamentals of Music Technology  Konrad Kaczmarek

Fundamental principles of music technology including sound recording and reproduction, digital audio, digital signal processing, audio synthesis techniques, musical acoustics, and psychoacoustics. Emphasis on the theory of music technology through investigations into the tools used to analyze, perform, and create electroacoustic and computer-generated music.  QR, SC  RP
T 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 334b, Analysis and Performance of Early Music  Grant Herreid

Continuation of MUSI 223. Analytical techniques applied to interpretation and performance. Emphasis on the development of vocal technique and sight-reading skills. Students in this class form the nucleus of the Yale Collegium Musicum. Prerequisite: MUSI 223 or equivalent. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information see www.yale.edu/oci.  HU  RP
M 3:30pm-5:20pm
* MUSI 347b / RLST 361b, Music in Indigenous Religions from Asia  Staff

Examination of case studies from different parts of Asia to study the confluence of indigeneity, spirituality, and musical performance. Consideration of various perspectives on the meaning of indigenous sacred music by engaging with scholarship from disciplines ranging from ethnomusicology, anthropology, Asian Studies, and religious studies. Focus on series of monographs and engagement with field recordings, commercial music albums, fiction, and films from various parts of Asia.  HU
MUSI 348b / AFAM 303b / THST 307b, Orisa Worship and Afro-Cuban Folkloric Dance  Maya Berry

Study of Afrodescendants in Cuba and how sacred forms of Orisa worship were practiced, studied, interpreted, and represented on stage. Understanding blackness, collective black-lived experiences, and the black dancing body in Cuba. Readings drawn from art history, ethnomusicology, anthropology, dance studies, religious studies, theology, history, and black studies, providing close study of concepts of religion, deity, folklore, nation, blackness, and dance. Concepts illustrated through readings, movement practice (dance classes), and spectatorship.  HU
* MUSI 349b / RLST 365b / SAST 372b, Sound, Religion, and Colonial Encounter  Staff

Investigation of the importance of sound and music for the politics and experience of religion in colonized societies. Engagements with theories of sovereignty, violence, the state, migration, slavery, and plantation labor. Broad geographic focus with main examples from South and Southeast Asia.  HU
* MUSI 350a, History of Western Music: Middle Ages and Renaissance  Henry Parkes

A detailed investigation of the history of musical style from A.D. 900 to 1600. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
* MUSI 351b, History of Western Music: Baroque and Classical  James Hepokoski

A detailed investigation of the history of musical style from 1600 to 1800. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm
MUSI 370b / ART 371b, Sound Art  Martin Kersels

Introduction to sound art, a contemporary artistic practice that uses sound and listening as mediums, often creating psychological or physiological reactions as part of the finished artwork. The history of sound art in relation to the larger history of art and music; theoretical underpinnings and practical production; central debates and problems in contemporary sound art. Includes creation and in-class critique of experimental works. Materials fee: $25.  HU
W 1:30pm-5:20pm
* MUSI 371b / ENAS 344b, Musical Acoustics and Instrument Design  Lawrence Wilen and Konrad Kaczmarek

Practical study of musical acoustics. The physics and design of musical instruments, with attention to all aspects of sound, from the origin of the vibration in the instrument to the perception by the listener. Student teams design and construct novel instruments and produce relevant applications. Requires a basic knowledge of physics, including concepts of kinetic and potential energy and Newton's laws.  QR, HU, SC  RP
MW 9am-10:15am
MUSI 372a / CPSC 134a, Programming Musical Applications  Scott Petersen

Topics in computer music, including musical representations for computing, automated music analysis and composition, interactive systems, and virtual instrument design. Use of domain-specific programming languages and libraries to explore how the principles of computer science can be applied to music to create new interfaces, instruments, and tools. Recommended preparation: the ability to read music or play an instrument.  QR
MW 9am-10:15am
Level IV
* MUSI 412a, Composition Seminar III  Konrad Kaczmarek

Advanced project-oriented studies in music composition and chamber music. Extended study of contemporary procedures and compositional techniques. Group and individual lessons. Prerequisites: MUSI 312 and 313. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 20. To audition, students should upload one or two PDF scores and MP3 recordings in a single zip file by 4 p.m. on Wednesday, September 7, to the designated 412 audition dropbox on the Composition Seminar Web page at classesv2.yale.edu. Students with questions should contact the instructor at konrad.kaczmarek@yale.edu.
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 413b, Composition Seminar IV  Kathryn Alexander

Advanced project-oriented studies in music composition. Extended study of contemporary procedures and compositional techniques. Group and individual lessons. Prerequisites: MUSI 312 and 313.  Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 20. To audition, students should upload one or two PDF scores and MP3 recordings in a single zip file by 4 p.m. on Wednesday, January 18, to the designated 413 audition dropbox on the Composition Seminar Web page at classesv2.yale.edu. Students with questions should contact the instructor at kathryn.alexander@yale.edu.
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 435b / HUMS 231b, Music in European Thought: Three Moments in the Modern Era Staff

An inquiry into the role of music and thought about music at three critical junctures in the intellectual and cultural history of modern Europe: the birth of modernity and opera; the Enlightenment and the classical style; and German romanticism and Beethoven.  HU
* MUSI 440b, The Chamber Music of Johannes Brahms  Michael Friedmann

A study of selected chamber works by Brahms, coupling analytical research with practical performance. Advanced violinists, violists, cellists, clarinetists, hornists, and pianists admitted by audition.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm
Research Seminars
* MUSI 470a, Noise  Brian Kane

A study of noise from musical, philosophical, and cultural perspectives. Reading and discussion of theoretical, political, ecological, and avant-garde writings on noise; critical study of musical repertoire involving noise, sound art, and recorded sound; introduction to current debates in sound studies and auditory culture; hands-on work with electronic noise.  HU
M 2:30pm-4:20pm
* MUSI 478b / MUSI 578, Music, Service, and Society  Sebastian Ruth

The role of musicians in public life, both on and off the concert stage. New ways in which institutions of music can participate in the formation of civil society and vibrant communities. The potential influence of music on the lives of people experiencing political or social oppression.  HU  RP
HTBA
Individual Study
* MUSI 471a and MUSI 472b, Individual Study  Staff

Original essay in ethnomusicology, music history, music theory, or music technology and/or multimedia art under the direction of a faculty adviser. Admission to the course upon submission to the department of the essay proposal by the registration deadline, and approval of the director of undergraduate studies.
HTBA
Individual Instruction in Performance
* MUSI 360a or b, Performance: First Term  Richard Gard

Individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Auditions for assignment to instructors (for both credit and noncredit lessons) are required for freshmen and some returning students, and are held only at the beginning of the fall term. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS.
HTBA
* MUSI 361a or b, Performance: Second Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 360.
HTBA
* MUSI 362a or b, Performance: Third Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 361. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS.
HTBA
* MUSI 363a or b, Performance: Fourth Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 362.
HTBA
* MUSI 364a or b, Performance: Beyond Fourth Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 363.  0 Course cr
HTBA
* MUSI 460a or b, Advanced Performance: First Term  Richard Gard

Individual instruction for advanced performers in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Auditions for assignment to instructors (for both credit and noncredit lessons) are required for freshmen and some returning students, and are held only at the beginning of the fall term. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS.
HTBA
* MUSI 461a or b, Advanced Performance: Second Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 460.
HTBA
* MUSI 462a or b, Advanced Performance: Third Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 461. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS. Prerequisite: MUSI 361 or 461.
HTBA
* MUSI 463a or b, Advanced Performance: Fourth Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 462.
HTBA
* MUSI 464a or b, Advanced Performance: Beyond Fourth Term  Richard Gard

Continuation of MUSI 463.  0 Course cr
HTBA
Senior Projects
* MUSI 490a and MUSI 491b, The Senior Essay  Staff

Preparation of a senior essay under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the director of undergraduate studies.
HTBA
* MUSI 492a and MUSI 493b, The Senior Project in Composition  Staff

Preparation of a senior composition project under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the composition faculty of the Department of Music. Prerequisites: MUSI 312, 313, 412, and 413.
HTBA
* MUSI 494a and MUSI 495b, The Senior Project in Musical Theater Composition  Staff

Preparation of a senior composition project in the field of musical theater under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the coordinator of the Shen Curriculum. Two terms of MUSI 314 or equivalent.
HTBA
* MUSI 496a and MUSI 497b, The Senior Recital  Staff

Preparation and performance of a senior recital and accompanying essay under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Prerequisite: MUSI 461.
HTBA

 

Check further details on University website

How to Apply

All applicants for freshman admission must submit one of the following:

  • The Coalition Application with Yale-Specific Questions
  • The Common Application with Yale-Specific Questions
  • The QuestBridge National College Match Application

Additional requirements for all freshman applicants:

  • $80 Application Fee or Fee Waiver
  • Two Teacher Recommendations
  • One Counselor Recommendation
  • School Report (including Transcript)
  • Standardized Test Results
  • Mid-Year Report (due when first semester/term senior grades are available at your school)

Check further details on University website

Join the largest Study Abroad community      Log in      Sign up